American soldiers and their children who died in Quebec during the War of 1812

While reading Vicky Lapointe’s blog, Quebec City’s history and its region, I came across a year-old post that made me realize that publishing burial information, in the hope a distant relative will learn about it, is not new. Even some people in the 19th century were doing it, albeit in newspapers.

On July 18, 1889, the Quebec Weekly Chronicle published a letter from Quebec City resident N. LeVasseur, who had found among some old manuscripts “a list of American soldiers who, with some of their children, died and were buried in Quebec, during the second American war in Canada, in 1812, 1813, 1814 and 1815.”

Evening View from the Citadel, Quebec by Millicent Mary Chaplin. Library and Archives Canada, C-000859.

Evening View from the Citadel, Quebec by Millicent Mary Chaplin. Library and Archives Canada, C-000859.

Mr. LeVasseur explained in the letter his reasons for sharing the list. “The following list which is extracted from the registers of the English Metropolitan Church of Quebec, may be of some interest specially to the relatives of the unfortunate soldiers from the other side of the lines, who may be living somewhere in the United States or who may have settled in Canada.”

The transcribed letter and list are available on Quebec City’s history and region. In addition to this transcription, the blog contains many extracts from English-language newspapers in Quebec city, such as the Quebec Mercury and the Quebec Morning Chronicle.

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About Gail Dever

Gail Dever is a Montreal-based genealogist and blogger and a webmaster for the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa.
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